COVID-19 by the numbers since it all began

COVID-19 by the numbers since it all began

BY MARCY SHORTUSE – While cases numbering, on average, 350 a day are still being reported to the Florida Department of Health, Governor Ron DeSantis is talking about opening schools and finding small ways to re-open the economy. It may seem like a rash move to some, but most business owners don’t know how much longer they can hold out without income. Meanwhile, school administrators are facing complaints from parents and teachers about inadequate and frustrating “distance learning” procedures.

It is definitely not the time to want to be a politician, as they are making delicate decisions that will greatly impact life in this state as we know it … no matter what the decision is.

When projections for COVID-19’s curve first started to be publicized, our projected “peak” date was in early May. Somewhere along the line last week that date was changed to April 26, then to April 21. Just this week researchers announced it would more than likely be May 3, with May 6 predicted to be the “deadliest” day.

To give you an overall perspective of each day since two presumptive COVID-19 cases were found in the state, we have composed a timeline. 

• On March 1 the Florida Department of Health announced there were two presumptive positives in the state, total. By March 10 there were 21 confirmed cases reported in the state, total. This is the day we started receiving daily reports on the numbers. On March 11 there were 23 confirmed cases in the state, a rise of 2 cases in 24 hours.

On March 12 in the morning there were 26 confirmed cases in the state, a rise of 3 cases in 24 hours. On March 12 at 1:50 p.m. there 27 confirmed cases. On March 12 at 10:47 p.m. there were 42 cases. That is a total of 19 new cases in 24 hours.

• March 13:  The numbers held at 42 cases. Still no deaths.

• March 14:  The first person died in Florida, in Orange County. By the end of that day there were 64 cases and one death, a rise of 22 new cases in 24 hours.

• March 15: The second death, a man in Lee County, was reported. At 8:49 a.m. that day we broke 100 cases, for a rise of 36 cases in 24 hours.

• March 16: 160 cases reported, five deaths, an increase of  60.

• March 17: 216 cases reported and 7 deaths, an increase of 56.

• March 18: 328 cases reported, 8 deaths, an increase of 112.

• March 19: 432 cases reported, 9 deaths, an increase of 104.

• March 20: 563 confirmed cases, 10 deaths, an increase of 131.

• March 21: 763 cases, 12 deaths, an increase of 200.

• March 22: 1,007 cases, 13 deaths, an increase of 244.

• March 23: 1,227 cases, 17 deaths, an increase of 220.

• March 24: 1,412 cases, 18 deaths, an increase of 185.

• March 25: 1,977 cases, 23 deaths, an increase of 565.

• March 26: 2,484 cases, 29 deaths, an increase of 507.

• March 27: 3,198 cases confirmed, 46 deaths.

• March 28: 3,763 confirmed cases and 54 deaths. 

• March 29: 4,950 confirmed cases and 60 deaths.

• March 30: 5,704 cases and 71 deaths.

• March 31: 6,741 cases and 85 deaths.

• April 1: 7,773 cases, 101 deaths.

• April 2: 8,010 cases, 128 deaths.

• April 3: 9,008 cases, 144 deaths.

• April 4: 11,173 cases, 195 deaths.

• April 5: 12,350 cases, 221 deaths.

• April 6: 13,629 cases, 254 deaths.

• April 7: 14,747 cases, 296 deaths.

• April 8: 15,698 cases, 323 deaths.

• April 9: 16,364 cases, 354 deaths.

• April 10: 17,968 cases, 419 deaths.

• April 11: 18,494 cases, 438 deaths.

• April 12: 19,895 cases, 461 deaths.

• April 13: 21,019 cases, 499 deaths.

• April 14: 21,628 cases, 571 deaths.

• April 15: 22,519 cases, 614 deaths.

Keep in mind, these case numbers are approximately .1 percent of the state’s population (just including residents, not visitors), which means only that percentage of people have been tested. A large majority of those people are on the East Coast. To be tested on this side of the state is rare.

There are still no confirmed cases in the 33921 zip code. As of Wednesday, in Charlotte County there were 124 total cases, five deaths and 21 hospitalized. Their ages ranged from 16 to 96, with a median age of 68. Of that number 58 percent were female, 40 percent were male.

As of Wednesday there were less than five cases reported in the 34224 zip code of Englewood. There were five to nine cases in the 34223 Englewood zip code that includes the Sarasota County portion, but there were somewhere between five and nine cases in the 33981 zip code, which includes part of East Englewood and South Gulf Cove. In the 33947 zip code, which includes Rotonda West, there are five to nine cases.

Please let us know how you feel about the state re-opening for business on May 1 by taking our poll at bocabeacon.com. There is also a link on our Facebook page.